Turns Out Natural Springs Can Fix What Your Doc Can’t

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    Gorodisskij / shutterstock.com
    Gorodisskij / shutterstock.com

    Ever since the ancient Egyptians, people have enjoyed sitting in hot water. While we use the term to talk about being in trouble, in practice, it can be one of the most relaxing and reenergizing things someone can do. Hopping in a hot bath at home is great, while a whirlpool or Jacuzzi tub can step things up a notch in terms of relaxation and body benefits. Especially with the massage jets. A day at the spa with fluffy cotton robes, cucumber slices on the eyes, and hot towels is incredibly relaxing.

    Yet, they all pale in comparison to the health benefits of natural hot springs.

    They have existed across the globe in various forms, and we have a record of them being used since the Greeks around 70 BC. Using them in conjunction with exercise courts, swimming pools, and cold tubs proved to be life-changing. The use of herbs, oils, and became renowned, and suddenly spa towns popped up across Europe.

    By the 16th century, people took anecdotal evidence as proof that they were healing. People would travel for miles, and as advances in transportation evolved, so did the distance they would travel to enjoy them. However, by WWII, they had fallen out of favor as changes in entertainment, technology, and medicine surpassed them. While the US saw a surge in them in the 19th and 20th centuries, they weren’t as popular as they were in Europe.

    Now, experts are discovering these hot springs lower blood pressure, relax joints and muscles, lower the heart rate, drop cortisol, and increase dopamine. In essence, these hot springs and their high mineral contents are perfect for the human body, and it’s a wonder we ever stopped using them so frequently. Those who have heart issues, need to be cautious about shocking the system too greatly, so seeing a doctor to be sure is always a good call. While they will all tell you it won’t “cure” anything, they can advise if it can help.

    Natural hot springs in the US can be found in Arkansas, California, Colorado, Alaska, Wyoming, Virginia, and elsewhere. It might be worth finding where the closest one is near you so you can explore some of these natural benefits.