RNC Strategists Campaign Ad Bashing Democratic Leadership Rivals Michelle Obama’s Recent Speech in Views

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Republican strategist and congressional candidate Kimberly Klacik released a viral campaign ad in the midst of the Democratic Party’s national convention, and the results don’t look great for Democrats.

Klacik, who is a 38-year-old wife, mother, and outspoken Black Republican, has decided to run for Maryland’s District 7 Congressional seat following the passing of the late Rep. Elijah Cummings.

The GOP candidate made a point to lay the foundation for her ad, asking whether those watching cared about Black lives and the impact that Democratic leadership has had on the city of Baltimore.

“Democrats don’t want you to see this,” the ad was captioned. “They’re scared that I’m exposing what life is like in Democrat-run cities. That’s why I’m running for Congress. Because All Black Lives Matter. Baltimore Matters. And black people don’t have to vote Democrat.”

“Do you care about black lives? The people who run Baltimore don’t. I can prove it, walk with me. They don’t want you to see this,” Klacik says, before strolling through the devastated city.

She encouraged fellow Black Americans to break free of the stigma that they have to vote for a Democrat and went so far as to say that living in a Democratic-controlled city is one of the worst things a Black person can do for themselves.

“It’s not just Baltimore,” the Republican later adds. “The worst place for a black person to live in America is a Democrat-controlled city. It’s 2020, name a blue city where black people’s lives have gotten better. Democrats think black people are stupid. They think they can control us forever, that we won’t demand better, that we’ll keep voting for them, forever, despite what they’ve done to our families and our communities.”

The compelling campaign ad has been viewed millions of times, and an unflattering comparison was drawn between Klacik’s video and that of former first lady Michelle Obama by Canadian political analyst Jeff Ballingall.

“By digital metrics … The former first lady was completely outdone by an unknown house candidate, [Kimberly Klacik],” Ballingal said in a Twitter thread Tuesday.

The political analyst pointed out that despite being pushed by many of the biggest names in media on Facebook, Obama didn’t come close to achieving the “virality” of Klacik’s video, promoted by “new media outlets.”

According to Ballingall’s calculations, Klacik’s video had amassed more than 12.5 million views on Facebook while Obama’s video totaled under three million, including the views garnered by conservative pundit Graham Allen where he criticized her speech.

Twitter saw similar, though less drastic results, with Klacik bringing in around 25 percent more views than Obama as of Tuesday afternoon.

Some believe that Klacik could be mirroring another untested political candidate and following the same game plan as President Donald Trump in 2016. The president is widely believed to have attracted the audience that he did because of his new ideas and willingness to break outside of the traditional to serve the American people.

While virtually everything concerning the upcoming elections is still wildly unknown, what is known is that the virtual world plays a part. One campaign add, where it used to have to be funded for every play on television and radio, can be boosted by the individuals who believe in a cause. Klacik is already cashing in on Americans desire for a different kind of politician, and it is causing her to outdistance what many progressives would call one of their greatest icons, Michelle Obama.

Is it a perfect comparison? No. Does it guarantee that Klacik can flip a firmly blue seat formerly held by one of the most entrenched members of Congress toward an avid Republican? Not at all. But it does mean that nation-wide, people care about what Klacik has to say, more than they care about what Michelle Obama might be “Becoming.” And that should give us all hope.

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